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Antonio Mondonico

m3m83r

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Ich habe gestern durch zufall ein Mondonico gefunden. Ich kannte die Marke bis dahin nicht.
War wohl mal was ganz feines.

Mondonico's History
The Mondonico family might be the oldest Italian framebuilding dynasty. Starting in 1929 with Giuseppe Mondonico and his brother Angelo, the Mondonicos have been personally building steel, lugged frames with their own hands. That tradition has continued right up to today, with third generation builder Mauro Mondonico working side by side with his father, Antonio. The family's involvement with cycling and racing is deeper now than ever.

The Mondonicos believe that their family has always lived in Concorezzo, a small village just outside Milan, very near the famous Monza Motor Speedway. Giuseppe Mondonico, the founder of the Mondonico shop, and his brother Angelo had been industrial mechanics. No one knows anymore exactly what that work entailed. But the family knows that they were always mad about bicycles, cycling and cycle racing. The pictures of Binda and Girardengo in the opening credits of OLN's Giro d'Italia are from Giuseppe Mondonico's collection of racers and racing from that great age of cycling.
On opening the shop in 1929, Giuseppe immediately started building frames and supplying the local racers. No one knows where Giuseppe acquired this skill. Mauro supposes that other framebuilders had taught him. While Giuseppe built frames, Angelo did the repairs. At that time in Italy, this was a big and important business because bicycles were the primary form of transport, especially in a small village like Concorezzo.

In those pre-war years, Giuseppe built frames using both Columbus and Falck tubing. The special characteristic of Mondonico frame building, the use of pins to secure the joints instead of a tack braze, had not yet been adopted. That came later.

With the coming of the great worldwide depression in 1932, Mauro says, the majority of the work done in the shop was in repairs. It was a hard job because in those days, no one had much money to pay for their work. Giuseppe and Angelo had to work long hours for very small sums of money.

Giuseppe and Angelo worked in the shop together through the war. As the economy had strengthened some in the ensuing years, life was a bit kinder to the Mondonico family. They opened a coffee shop (called a "bar" in Italy) next to the bike shop.

At the end of the war, the economy and conditions in general in Italy were terrible. The famous movie The Bicycle Thief shows the poverty of that time, in which there could be no more valuable possession than a bicycle and the mobility it could give. After the war, Angelo left the shop to return to industrial work. He passed away in 1971.

Meanwhile, Giuseppe continued to work in the shop, building frames and repairing bikes. As Antonio grew up, he worked in the shop. As a young man, Antonio was given the job of working on the racing bikes. The frames Antonio built then used Columbus SL and SP tubing. In those days, the lugs were long and heavy, called "lastra", being pressed and welded. The modern investment cast lugs didn't start showing up until 1977-1978.

When Giuseppe died December 30, 1973, the shop was closed. Antonio went to work in other framebuilding shops that were looking for a skilled builder. He worked in Gianni Motta's shop for two years, 1976 and 1977. He then moved on to the Colnago shop and built frames there until 1979. Colnago, as a young man, rode for a team that was headquartered in Giuseppe's shop and would visit the Mondonico home. In Italy, the cycling world is one big family.

Italian Cycling ROYALTY

While Mondonico worked at the Motta shop, he also worked as a team mechanic. This work was completely unrelated to his duties at Motta. This was purely an avocation born of love of the sport. Antonio had a French friend who was bringing strong riders into Italy, among them, a young Sean Kelly. Antonio was this team's mechanic. Antonio still remembers the your amateur Kelly who came to sleep in the Mondonico home in Concorezzo before riding and winning the Piccolo Giro di Lombardia. Mondonico has said that when a builder not only builds the bikes, but goes into the field and assists the racer, he gains insights that are impossible to gain any other way. Faliero Masi, another of the great Milan builders, calls it the only laboratory for a builder. In this modern age of multi-million dollar teams, this laboratory is almost impossible to re-create.

In 1979, Antonio Mondonico reopened his own shop, and the Mondonico name was again available to discerning riders. There had never been a time when Antonio didn't build frames in his adult life. But for several years, it was always for others and it was those others who sold his work with their name.

Throughout the late 1970's and early 1980's, Paolo Guerciotti experienced a boom in demand for his bikes and frames. He needed a guiding hand to make sure that the frames were of high quality. Up until then, Guerciotti had several different builders building his frames. In 1984, Paolo Guerciotti and Antonio Mondonico went into partnership to produce both Guerciotti and Mondonico frames. They were wildly successful, with Antonio supervising the production of about 2,000 frames a year.

But, as they worked together, it became apparent that their goals were not really identical. Realizing this, they ended the partnership in 1989. Antonio returned to his real love; building a few, special frames, with his own hands. Instead of the big, tilt-up concrete factory under Guerciotti-Mondonico Cycles, the Mondonico shop is in the back of their house. There, as Antonio and now the third generation builder Mauro work, there is a constant stream of cycling and racing aficionados, coming to visit and talk bikes and racing.

Mondonico has built frames that have won Classics and graced the podium of both the Tour de France and the Giro d'Italia. Sadly, as in years past, others got to take the credit for Mondonico's work. The frames he built for Claudio Chiappucci, as with Singer for Poulidor and Masi for Merckx, received the decals of other factories. (See photo below...draw your own conclusions!)

Legendary Racer, Legendary Builder

Today, Antonio and Mauro work side by side in their small shop, using many of the very same tools that grandfather Giuseppe used. There has been no change in the importance of handwork. Care and time reign supreme. Mauro prepares the materials. He cuts and miters the tubes and files and readies the lugs. Mauro also brazes in the fork tips, brazes on the “braze-ons” and assembles the main triangle in the jig. Antonio brazes up the main triangles, assembles the whole frame together, making sure it is all straight and correct. Mauro then does the final sandblasting and filing.

While the Mondonico specialty is lugged frames, they also build silver fillet brazed frames. With the advent of multi-shaped mega tubes, lugs cannot always be used to join the tubes. Of course, the Mondonicos have not only adopted modern, super-thinwall steel tubes in the different sizes and shapes, they also use carbon for the rear triangle. Yet, their heart is in steel. While every other builder has run from steel, the Mondonicos embrace it, loving its beautiful feel, long life and grace appearance.

With luck, that tradition will continue long into the future as riders looking for that beautiful, perfect ride rather than the material or trend of the day, seek out the Mondonicos and one of their beautiful hand-made frames.

There are many intangible reasons why a demanding rider would want a Mondonico bicycle: their beauty, their handling, among others. We'll discuss those, but there are some specific, quantifiable reasons why a Mondonico frame is the best of Italian bikes.

Framebuilding Techniques
Nearly all builders assemble the tubes of a frame on a large steel flat plate called a jig. Each joint is heated to brazing temperature and a bit of brass is applied. This is known as "tack brazing". The frame is then put on an alignment table and made straight. The frame is then put in a stand much like bike shops use to repair bikes and the lugs are completely brazed up.

While this is the technique of nearly all builders, it is not the technique of Mondonico. Tack brazing requires that the tubes be heated twice, robbing the special, exotic cycle tubes of some of their special qualities. When the tubes are assembled on the jig, Mondonico drills each lug and inserts a tapered steel pin. Then the frame is aligned and brazed up. The joint is heated only once, preserving the resilience of the Columbus tubing that Mondonico uses. The pins are then filed flush with the lugs. Obviously, this is a vastly more time-consuming method. Feel the inside of the tubes of a Mondonico frame at the bottom bracket. You can feel the pins, your guarantee that at least one craftsman is dedicated to making the best, not the most.


If a Mondonico frame is so great, then why don't we see Tour de France teams riding these bikes? To equip a major pro team requires millions of dollars. A builder must pay 100's of thousands of dollars to equip even a mid-level team. There is no way that an artisan building a few frames can sponsor a team. It is an interesting paradox that the bikes that are often the most highly thought of by some enthusiasts because of their racing promotion are those that are the products of near mass production: "industrial frames", we call them. Yet, Mondonico frames have seen racing success at the highest levels. Mondonico is what is known as a "framebuilder of trust". This is a builder that builds for top pros, yet supplies their frames unpainted. The rider then has the frame painted in the team colors. This is an old tradition, because top riders often want that edge that the finest builders can give them. Singer of Paris built for Polidor, Masi built for Merckx and Coppi. Among others, Mondonico has built for Chiappucci.

Orginal findet ihr auf: http://www.smartcycles.com/about_mondonico.htm
oder
hier ein Ähnlicher Artikel: http://bikeraceinfo.com/oralhistory/mondonico-shop-story.html
Und nun das aller beste "der Meister bei der Arbeit" http://bikeraceinfo.com/photo-galleries/1-mondonico-framebuilding.html
 

m3m83r

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Bilder von meinem Rahmen gibt es wenn er da ist! Jetzt geht es daran raus zu finden welcher Jahrgang es ist und was ich daran verbauen will.
 

Bianchi-Hilde

Keine Ahnung aber große Fresse
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Wir hatten um 1990/92 ma Mondonico Rahmen als Team-Rahmen, aus SL und SLX, unser Spitzenfahrer glaube ich sogar aus TSX. Waren sehr schicke Dinger.
 

m3m83r

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Da kommt Freude auf! Hoffentlich halte ich ihn bald in den Händen! Und wieder eine neue Ausstattungsvariante Gefunden ...
Campa, Shimano und jetzt Sachs! Gibt es auch eine Gruppe von Gipiemme aus den 90igern oder Ofmega oder Modolo? Gleich mal morgen Velobase bemühen ...
 

m3m83r

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Rahmen ist angekommen! 126 Einbaubreite, SLX Rohre und ein 27,7 Sattelstütze, Campa ausfallende und Cinelli Tretlagerdose! Ein wilder mix ... Bilder mach ich noch bei Tageslicht für euch.
 

Cromovelato

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Ich bin das erste Mal über ihn gestolpert, als er für Bicycle Guide sieben bis auf den Rohrsatz (Aelle bis EL-OS und Neuron) identische Rahmen gebaut hat, um zu testen, ob das Material spürbar das Fahrverhalten ändert:
http://www.habcycles.com/m7.html
 

Profiamateur

...war mal schnell.
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Wir wollen Bilder!!!

[user]perugino[/user] überlegt sich gerade, seinen zu verkaufen. Ich weiß nicht, ob nur das Rahmenset oder als komplettes Rad. Wer Interesse hat, könnte ihn ja mal anschreiben. Der Rahmen sieht super aus, im Zustand 1-2. Ich schreibe das hier, damit ich nicht selbst in Versuchung komme. RH dürfte irgend etwas zwischen 56,5cm und 58cm (m-m) sein, wenn ich mich nicht täusche. Vielleicht habe ich sogar Bilder, muss mal schauen...
 

m3m83r

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Wie erkennt man einen Rahmen den Antonio Mondocino selber gebaut hat?!

#14 - FWIW, one thing to check would be the existence of pins inside the tubes. You can pop off your crank and bottom bracket and look for "nails" inside, where the tubing meets the BB shell. These are a good indicator of Antonio building the frame, though of course, there were certainly others pinning frames at the time. If not, then there is some possibility of Billato or another frame builder doing the work.
 

m3m83r

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Noch mehr Hinweise zur Fertigung seiner Rahmen:

Framebuilding
Nearly all builders assemble the tubes of a frame on a large steel flat plate called a jig. Each joint is heated to brazing temperature and a bit of brass is applied. This is known as "tack brazing". The frame is then put on an alignment table and made straight. The frame is then put in a stand much like bike shops use to repair bikes and the lugs are completely brazed up.

While this is the technique of nearly all builders, it is not the technique of Mondonico. Tack brazing requires that the tubes be heated twice, robbing the special, exotic cycle tubes of some of their special qualities. When the tubes are assembled on the jig, Mondonico drills each lug and inserts a tapered steel pin. Then the frame is aligned and brazed up. The joint is heated only once, preserving the resilience of the Columbus tubing that Mondonico uses. The pins are then filed flush with the lugs. Obviously, this is a vastly more time-consuming method. Feel the inside of the tubes of a Mondonico frame at the bottom bracket. You can feel the pins, your guarantee that at least one craftsman is dedicated to making the best, not the most.

http://www.smartcycles.com/about_mondonico.htm
 

m3m83r

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Und nun Teil 2:









Ich hoffe man kann die Farbe vom Rahmen einiger maßen erkennen. Auf den ersten Fotos die ich von ihm gesehen habe dachte ich er wäre braun. Doch eigentlich ist es etwas zwischen Grün/Braun/Gold! Abgefahrene Farbe.

Anhand der Cinelli Aero Dose würde ich den Rahmen auf etwa Mitte der 80iger Jahre Datieren (83-84).
 

Bonanzero

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Vllt. auch etwas später. SPX ist noch bis Anfang 90er mit diesen Dekoren versehen worden.
Warum ist aber der Lack so gut und die Gabel so räudig? Sogar der Chrom am Hinterbau ist besser als der an der Gabel. Normalerweise ist das ja umgekehrt.
Den Hinterbau kriexte sicher leicht wieder hin, aber bei der Gabel kannst du schonmal über eine Neuverchromung nachdenken.
 

m3m83r

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Die späteren Modelle vom Diamond SLX sind alle ohne die Aero Dose. Und ich meine gelesen zu haben, das es diese Dose nicht all zu lange gab. Deshalb bin ich von den 90igern abgerückt! Wann hat man von 126 auf 130 EB umgestellt?! Mein Rahmen hat nämlich 126 EB, der von perugino 130 EB!
 

Bonanzero

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130 mm kam mit 8-fach. Dura Ace ab 1991, 600, Campa und Sax ab 1992.
 

m3m83r

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Ich schau mal ob ich das mit der Aero Dose belegen kann das Sie nur in der Mitte der 80iger gab ...
 

Bianchi-Hilde

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dura Ace mit 130 kam 89 schon mit der UG Nabe
Ich meine, unsere Vereinsrahmen aus Anfang der 90er hatten die Cinelli Muffe noch...
 
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